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Profile: justine.luongo

Justine M. Luongo, known as Tina to all, is the Deputy Attorney-in-Charge of the Criminal Practice of The Legal Aid Society where she oversee the daily operations of the Practice's over 1200 staff who serve 230,000 clients in both trial and post convictions matters. Tina began her Legal Aid career in September 2002 as a staff attorney in the New York County office of the Criminal Practice after graduating Brooklyn Law School. In 2007, she was promoted to Supervising Attorney where she continued to directly represent clients, as well as manage the daily operation of her complex of attorneys, paralegals and investigators. Tina serves as the Chair of the American Bar Association Task Force on Comprehensive Criminal Representation which analyzed best practices to address the complex, life altering consequences that clients face when they are charged with or convicted of crimes. She is a member of the ABA Criminal Justice Council, and the National Legal Aid and Defender Association's Defender Research, Data and Analysis Advisory Committee (RDC). She has also served as an Adjunct Professor in New York Law School's Criminal Defense Clinic. While at Brooklyn Law School she co-chaired the LGBT student committee and was a member of the Moot Court Trial Team. She is integrally involved in The Legal Aid Society's diversity initiative that partners management and staff to look at ways to increase the diversity of the staff and provide cultural competency training both internally at the Society and to external stakeholders in the criminal justice system.

  • Login Count: 2
  • Join Date: 21/61/2017 52:70:00
  • Last on: 02/28/2017 13:57:31
  • Location: Deputy Attorney in Charge, Criminal Defense Practice Legal Aid Society of New York
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NAPD News

On March 18, 2017 - the 54th anniversary of the Gideon v. Wainright decision - NAPD published its Foundational Principleswhich are recommended to NAPD members and other persons and organizations interested in advancing the cause of equal justice for accused persons.  

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On March 2, 2017, NAPD released its Statement on Reducing Demand For Public Defense: Alternatives to Traditional Prosecution Can Reduce Defender Workload, Save Money, and Reduce RecidivismThere are more than 2 million people in jail and prison in the United States. This is a four-fold increase since 1980. This increase and the racial disproportionality among incarcerated people has led to alliances across the political spectrum to address the impact on people and on budgets.  As the new Coalition for Public Safety has put it, “Our country has an ‘overcriminalization’ problem and an ‘overincarceration’ problem — and it’s getting worse." NAPD authored this statement because there is a great opportunity to make transformative changes that can improve justice and save money.  A variety of organizations representing a wide spectrum of political views have joined together to end the systematic problem of overcriminalization and narrow the net of incarceration by reforming criminal codes.