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Profile: henry.martin

Born in Nashville, Tennessee. B.A. (political science), Vanderbilt University, 1971; J.D., Vanderbilt University, 1974. Private practice with emphasis on criminal law and civil liberties 1975-1985, Nashville. Federal Public Defender for the Middle District of Tennessee, July, 1985- present. Acting Federal Public Defender for the Western District of Tennessee, February 1995 - July 1996 and for the Western District of Michigan, May 1997 - September 1998. Member, Advisory Committee on Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, U.S. Judicial Conference, 1994-99; Founding President, Association of Federal Defenders,1995-98. Member: American Bar Association since 1971 (Chair, Defense Services Committee, Criminal Justice Section, 1990-93; member, Council of Criminal Justice Section, 1993-96; member Steering Committee, ABA Post Conviction Death Penalty Representation Project, 1994-98); Tennessee Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers since 1975(Board member, 1978-1994, President 1984-5); National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers since 1975(Co-chair, Death Penalty Committee, 1991-2); Chair, Board of Directors, Capital Case Resource Center of Tennessee, 1988-95; Chair, Death Penalty Working Group of the Defender Services Advisory Group 1987 - 2007 and 2010 - 2014. Recipient of National Association of Federal Defenders’ Terence F. MacCarthy Award, 2015. Faculty member of Assistant Federal Defender Orientation program and regular presenter at national, regional and local CJA training events. Blessed with loving family, talented co-workers, good friends and stimulating clients.

  • Login Count: 1
  • Join Date: 71/17/2016 30:0:00
  • Last on: 07/01/2016 17:38:57
  • Location: Federal Defender, Middle District of Tennessee (Nashville, TN)
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NAPD News

April 16, 2017: 60 Minutes' Anderson Cooper features the Orleans Public Defenders and NAPD General Counsel in a substantive segment about public defenders' excessive workloads, pervasive injustice, and the obligation of defenders to resist the "conveyer belt" of mass-incarceration. You can watch the compelling segment HERE 
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On March 18, 2017 - the 54th anniversary of the Gideon v. Wainright decision - NAPD published its Foundational Principleswhich are recommended to NAPD members and other persons and organizations interested in advancing the cause of equal justice for accused persons.  

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On March 2, 2017, NAPD released its Statement on Reducing Demand For Public Defense: Alternatives to Traditional Prosecution Can Reduce Defender Workload, Save Money, and Reduce RecidivismThere are more than 2 million people in jail and prison in the United States. This is a four-fold increase since 1980. This increase and the racial disproportionality among incarcerated people has led to alliances across the political spectrum to address the impact on people and on budgets.  As the new Coalition for Public Safety has put it, “Our country has an ‘overcriminalization’ problem and an ‘overincarceration’ problem — and it’s getting worse." NAPD authored this statement because there is a great opportunity to make transformative changes that can improve justice and save money.  A variety of organizations representing a wide spectrum of political views have joined together to end the systematic problem of overcriminalization and narrow the net of incarceration by reforming criminal codes.