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Profile: amanda.thibeault

Amanda's interest in criminal justice was first sparked when she met Glen Edward Chapman, an former death row inmate who was finally exonerated with the help of one of Amanda's college professors at the University of North Carolina at Asheville. After meeting Ed, Amanda vowed to fight for the little guy, the underdog, the dark horse. After graduating from the University of North Carolina at Asheville with a B.A. in Psychology in December of 2009, she attended Lewis and Clark Law School in Portland, Oregon. While in law school, she worked for Metropolitan Public Defender, as well as a variety of private defense attorneys. After graduating magna cum laude in May of 2013 and passing the Oregon State Bar Exam, Amanda began working with Metropolitan Public Defender from August 2013 to September 2015 as a full time trial attorney. She tried a wide variety of cases including misdemeanors, minor felonies, and major felonies. She obtained not guilty verdicts in both major felony sex crime cases that she tried, wrote a winning motion to exclude evidence in a murder case, and was one of the youngest attorneys to obtain a favorable Court of Appeals opinion in Oregon. Amanda left MPD in September of 2015 to move to San Diego, CA. In addition to her work with NAPD, she also works closely with Alex Bassos by helping to develop the capital resource section of MyGideon in order to provide better support to capital attorneys nationwide. Additionally, she contracts with a variety of private defense attorneys to provide legal research and writing support, and in the evenings, serves as an instructor to students seeking their associate's degree in criminal justice. In her free time, Amanda can be found riding one of her road bikes, (indoor) rock climbing, searching for the perfect slice of cake, and watching her husband sing opera.

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NAPD News

April 16, 2017: 60 Minutes' Anderson Cooper features the Orleans Public Defenders and NAPD General Counsel in a substantive segment about public defenders' excessive workloads, pervasive injustice, and the obligation of defenders to resist the "conveyer belt" of mass-incarceration. You can watch the compelling segment HERE 
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On March 18, 2017 - the 54th anniversary of the Gideon v. Wainright decision - NAPD published its Foundational Principleswhich are recommended to NAPD members and other persons and organizations interested in advancing the cause of equal justice for accused persons.  

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On March 2, 2017, NAPD released its Statement on Reducing Demand For Public Defense: Alternatives to Traditional Prosecution Can Reduce Defender Workload, Save Money, and Reduce RecidivismThere are more than 2 million people in jail and prison in the United States. This is a four-fold increase since 1980. This increase and the racial disproportionality among incarcerated people has led to alliances across the political spectrum to address the impact on people and on budgets.  As the new Coalition for Public Safety has put it, “Our country has an ‘overcriminalization’ problem and an ‘overincarceration’ problem — and it’s getting worse." NAPD authored this statement because there is a great opportunity to make transformative changes that can improve justice and save money.  A variety of organizations representing a wide spectrum of political views have joined together to end the systematic problem of overcriminalization and narrow the net of incarceration by reforming criminal codes.