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Profile: melindadrewer.flintstebbins

Since 2013, Flint Stebbins has been representing parents and foster children in dependency and child welfare matters with ABC Law Group. Flint has a Bachelor's degree in Biology with high honors and went to graduate school where he studied molecular development in the fruit fly, the molecular structure and operation of the Acetylcholine neurotransmitter receptor, and infectious diseases including Hantavirus and West Nile Virus. There, he also taught laboratory sections in Basic Biology and Mammalian Physiology. Flint then went to Chapman University School of Law. Before coming to ABC Law Group, Flint was an extern at the Orange County District Attorney’s Office and worked for several years in the Snohomish County Superior Court including 2 and a half years as the law clerk to the Honorable David A. Kurtz. Melinda L. Drewing began her legal career in child welfare cases as a Rule 9 Intern while Seattle University School of Law. Discovering a passion for an area of law she never even knew existed she worked in multiple capacities in this unique niche including child representation, serving as an Attorney Guardian ad Litem and a brief stint as an Assistant Attorney General. A defense attorney at heart she dedicated a majority of her career to reunifying families by providing legal defense to parents in dependencies for over ten years in Snohomish County, Wa. She is currently on a sabbatical as an associate attorney for ABC Law Group so she can chase after her five-year old twin boys.

  • Login Count: 2
  • Join Date: 92/72/2016 23:60:00
  • Last on: 09/28/2016 19:38:50
  • Location: Associates, ABC Law Group, Snohomish County, WA
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NAPD News

On March 18, 2017 - the 54th anniversary of the Gideon v. Wainright decision - NAPD published its Foundational Principleswhich are recommended to NAPD members and other persons and organizations interested in advancing the cause of equal justice for accused persons.  

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On March 2, 2017, NAPD released its Statement on Reducing Demand For Public Defense: Alternatives to Traditional Prosecution Can Reduce Defender Workload, Save Money, and Reduce RecidivismThere are more than 2 million people in jail and prison in the United States. This is a four-fold increase since 1980. This increase and the racial disproportionality among incarcerated people has led to alliances across the political spectrum to address the impact on people and on budgets.  As the new Coalition for Public Safety has put it, “Our country has an ‘overcriminalization’ problem and an ‘overincarceration’ problem — and it’s getting worse." NAPD authored this statement because there is a great opportunity to make transformative changes that can improve justice and save money.  A variety of organizations representing a wide spectrum of political views have joined together to end the systematic problem of overcriminalization and narrow the net of incarceration by reforming criminal codes.