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Profile: sunwolf

Dr. SunWolf was Training Director for Colorado's Public Defender Office when she left to get her M.A. and Ph.D. at the University of California, studying juries and persuasion. Two decades of trial work as a criminal defense attorney included a three-year stint in the appellate division. Her research has won numerous national awards, including her book, Practical Jury Dynamics2: From One Juror's Trial Perception to the Group's Decision-Making Processes, translating academic concepts of perception, group decision-making, and persuasion into practical trial tools. Now a social scientist and full professor at Santa Clara University, she teaches persuasion, group dynamics, interpersonal relationships, and jury law (as Visiting Professor the law school). Dr. SunWolf published the first communication theory based on jury deliberations (Decisional Regret Theory), which explains how deliberating jurors use counterfactual thinking to avoid anxiety about unwanted verdict outcomes. Her new book describes neuroscience and religious thinking of jurors: God-Thinking: Every Juror's Moral Brain (LexisNexis). As a public defender, she survived angry judges, misguided prosecutors, weird juries, and the most creative of clients.

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July 1, 2017: NAPD announces Save the Date for 2017 Workloads Institute, to be held at SLU Law School (St. Louis, MO) on November 17-18, 2017. Click HERE for a brochure with details and faculty!
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April 16, 2017: 60 Minutes' Anderson Cooper features the Orleans Public Defenders and NAPD General Counsel in a substantive segment about public defenders' excessive workloads, pervasive injustice, and the obligation of defenders to resist the "conveyer belt" of mass-incarceration. You can watch the compelling segment HERE 

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On March 18, 2017 - the 54th anniversary of the Gideon v. Wainright decision - NAPD published its Foundational Principles, which are recommended to NAPD members and other persons and organizations interested in advancing the cause of equal justice for accused persons.