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Profile: dan.kesselbrenner

Dan Kesselbrenner is a nationally recognized expert on the immigration consequences of criminal convictions and on contesting deportability in immigration proceedings. Dan is co-author of Immigration Law and Crimes, which was cited in the 2010 Supreme Court decision, Padilla v. Kentucky, and has also authored numerous articles on immigration law. Dan has trained over 5,000 attorneys for the criminal defense bar as well as state judges in immigration consequences. He serves as mentor to scores of attorneys. A former member of the Clinton-Gore Department of Justice Immigrant Transition Team, Danís work advancing and defending immigrantsí rights has earned him numerous awards, including the American Immigration Lawyers Associationís Jack Wasserman Litigation Award. Dan has directed the National immigration Project since 1986.

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  • Join Date: 21/51/2017 51:00:00
  • Last on: 03/04/2017 12:30:26
  • Location: Executive Director, National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild (Boston, MA)
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NAPD News

On March 18, 2017 - the 54th anniversary of the Gideon v. Wainright decision - NAPD published its Foundational Principleswhich are recommended to NAPD members and other persons and organizations interested in advancing the cause of equal justice for accused persons.  

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On March 2, 2017, NAPD released its Statement on Reducing Demand For Public Defense: Alternatives to Traditional Prosecution Can Reduce Defender Workload, Save Money, and Reduce RecidivismThere are more than 2 million people in jail and prison in the United States. This is a four-fold increase since 1980. This increase and the racial disproportionality among incarcerated people has led to alliances across the political spectrum to address the impact on people and on budgets.  As the new Coalition for Public Safety has put it, “Our country has an ‘overcriminalization’ problem and an ‘overincarceration’ problem — and it’s getting worse." NAPD authored this statement because there is a great opportunity to make transformative changes that can improve justice and save money.  A variety of organizations representing a wide spectrum of political views have joined together to end the systematic problem of overcriminalization and narrow the net of incarceration by reforming criminal codes.