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Profile: gina.pruski

Gina M. Pruski is Director of Training and Development for the Wisconsin State Public Defender’s Office (SPD). She was appointed Training Director in 2004. Gina has been with the SPD since 1992, starting her legal career as a staff attorney in the SPD’s Fond du Lac Trial Office and then later becoming the agency’s Deputy Legal Counsel where she performed the legislative liaison duties on behalf of the agency. Gina received her undergraduate degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1989 and her law degree from the University of Wisconsin Law School in 1992. She is also a 2000 graduate of Duke University's Strategic Leadership for State Executives Program. Gina is co-author of the Wisconsin Juvenile Law Handbook (1st, 2nd and 3rd editions) published by the State Bar of Wisconsin. She is a faculty member of the University of Wisconsin Law School’s Lawyering Skills Course and regularly volunteers as a judge for the Evan A. Evans Constitutional Law Moot Court Competition. She has served on various committees, including the Child Welfare Executive Steering Committee and the Children in Need Task Force. She was a state reviewer for the Federal Child and Family Services Review in August 2003. She is a currently a member of the Wisconsin State Training Council and served as Vice-Chair in 2009 and as Chair in 2010. Gina is a 2011 recipient of the Women in the Law honor bestowed by the Wisconsin Law Journal.

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  • Join Date: 21/51/2017 64:20:00
  • Last on: 03/02/2017 23:25:33
  • Location: Training Director, Wisconsin State Public Defender's Office (Madison, WI)
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NAPD News

On March 18, 2017 - the 54th anniversary of the Gideon v. Wainright decision - NAPD published its Foundational Principleswhich are recommended to NAPD members and other persons and organizations interested in advancing the cause of equal justice for accused persons.  

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On March 2, 2017, NAPD released its Statement on Reducing Demand For Public Defense: Alternatives to Traditional Prosecution Can Reduce Defender Workload, Save Money, and Reduce RecidivismThere are more than 2 million people in jail and prison in the United States. This is a four-fold increase since 1980. This increase and the racial disproportionality among incarcerated people has led to alliances across the political spectrum to address the impact on people and on budgets.  As the new Coalition for Public Safety has put it, “Our country has an ‘overcriminalization’ problem and an ‘overincarceration’ problem — and it’s getting worse." NAPD authored this statement because there is a great opportunity to make transformative changes that can improve justice and save money.  A variety of organizations representing a wide spectrum of political views have joined together to end the systematic problem of overcriminalization and narrow the net of incarceration by reforming criminal codes.