Members

NAPD's current membership is approximately 14,000 members. The vast majority of NAPD members are public defense professionals across all progessions essential to public defense delivery, including lawyers, investigators, social workers, paralegals, IT staff, communications professionals, researchers and administrative support. Our 14,000 members come from 80 organizations in 36 states, including the statewide public defender systems of Alaska, Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachussetts, Minnesota, Missouri, New Mexico, North Dakota, West Wirginia and Wyoming.

There are another 700 individual members, representing more than 300 additional jurisdictions from all 50 states and the U.S. Territories of Puerto Rico, Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands. NAPD membership includes advocates from both state-level and federal defender offices. NAPD also supports a growing number of student members.

Click here to see a list of organizational members.
  
 


NAPD News

On March 18, 2017 - the 54th anniversary of the Gideon v. Wainright decision - NAPD published its Foundational Principleswhich are recommended to NAPD members and other persons and organizations interested in advancing the cause of equal justice for accused persons.  

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On March 2, 2017, NAPD released its Statement on Reducing Demand For Public Defense: Alternatives to Traditional Prosecution Can Reduce Defender Workload, Save Money, and Reduce RecidivismThere are more than 2 million people in jail and prison in the United States. This is a four-fold increase since 1980. This increase and the racial disproportionality among incarcerated people has led to alliances across the political spectrum to address the impact on people and on budgets.  As the new Coalition for Public Safety has put it, “Our country has an ‘overcriminalization’ problem and an ‘overincarceration’ problem — and it’s getting worse." NAPD authored this statement because there is a great opportunity to make transformative changes that can improve justice and save money.  A variety of organizations representing a wide spectrum of political views have joined together to end the systematic problem of overcriminalization and narrow the net of incarceration by reforming criminal codes.